Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Life is a rock

There've been a number of songs that I've missed from when I was younger. Most of them I've been able to look up on wikipedia or youtube, and get the title if I could remember only parts of the lyrics (one exception being "Sweating Bullets" because I could only recall one specific part of the music video). But, there's been one song that was absolutely killing me because I'd play the music in my head, and it had a really fast set of lyrics consisting of band names and other song lyrics, but whenever I tried googling it, I'd just come up with hits on Billy Joel's We Didn't Start the Fire (which had a similar concept).

Then, as I was walking through Tenmonkan a couple days ago, I noticed that the complex's speaker system was playing music really, really softly. I picked out "Life is a rock", and I started shouting, "paper, paper, paper, paper". When it got to "at the end of my rainbow lies a golden oldie" I'm screaming, "I need a pen! I need a pen! I need a pen!"

I'm better now.

Life is a Rock, by Reunion (1974)


Interesting trivia: Reunion was a group made up of studio session musicians, led by Joey Levine. The music for "Life is a Rock" was written by Paul Di Franco, and lyrics by Norman Dolph.

Levine sang the bubble gum hits "Chewy Chewy" and "Yummy, Yummy, Yummy". He went on to become a jingle writer, creating Almond Joy's "Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut", "Gentlemen Prefer Hanes" and "This Bud's For You".

Paul Di Franco has 176 movie credits on IMDB, either as music director, producer or supervisor, with films including Scorpion King 4, American Pie Band Camp, Let Them Eat Rock and The Fantastic Four. He also has 8 credits as an actor.

Norman Dolph was an executive at Columbia Records, and funded the first recordings of the Velvet Underground. He's got one credit on IMDB as composer for Attila and the Great Blue Bean. There's a longer list of his works on Discogs. At the moment, he seems to be the president of a skin cream company, OxyGenius.com (unless that's a different Norman Dolph).

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